Filled with Hope After People's Climate March

When I heard about the People’s Climate March in New York city, I just had to go. Now I am a grandmother. I needed to do this for my five grandkids.

Vineyard Activists to Join March on Climate Change

More than 200,000 people are expect to converge on Central Park West in New York city on Sunday for the People’s Climate March. At least 22 of them will be from the Vineyard. Buses traveling to the march from Cape Cod are already full with a wait list.

Time to Wake Up to Climate Chaos

Have you been noticing the reports since Hurricane Sandy, consistently, nearly every week, all over the world — of very extreme weather events and conditions? If you’ve been denying yourself the opportunity to keep up on the details, now would be a good time to break the habit.

How Global Changes Affect Local Fisheries

The Future of Fisheries: Marine Protected Areas, Ecosystem Management, Climate Change and All That is the title of a free talk slated for Thursday, June 26, at 5 p.m. at the Chilmark Public Library.

Dr. Andrew Rosenberg, professor of natural resources policy and management and professor of the Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans and Space at the University of New Hampshire, is the guest speaker.

Saving the Planet, One Oyster at a Time

The Copenhagen climate summit has been much in the news for two weeks and the media is full of stories about rising carbon dioxide (C02) levels, increasing acidity of the oceans, drastic changes in weather patterns, the warmest decade on record, melting glaciers, rising sea water levels and coastal communities in imminent danger of inundation. And that’s just the tip of the melting iceberg!

Climate Changes Island Landscape

The extraordinary beauty, rich geological history and challenges for preservation of the Vineyard landscape were all topics for discussion last Wednesday evening in paleoecologist David Foster’s guest lecture at the Polly Hill Arboretum in West Tisbury.

Oak Bluffs Plots the Future With Rising Sea in Mind

There’s been a great deal of focus lately on the local effects of the rush by federal and state authorities to build big wind farms near the Vineyard to ameliorate climate change, but very little focus on the local effects of climate change itself.

Except in Oak Bluffs, where there is quiet work underway to prepare for the worst, including sea level rise that is expected to erase beachfront property as it is now known, and the potentially ruinous effects of extreme storms caused by climate change. And it’s all backed by a state grant.

What Climate Change Means to You

That well-worn phrase — climate change. We know it’s out there, hovering over our lives like a heavy cloud. But what does it mean exactly — to you and the Island of Martha’s Vineyard?

It means striking changes in the three most critical components of Island life:

• The natural environment — the air, land and water;

• Our physical well being — our human health;

• The local economy.