When Butterflies Blend
Suzan Bellincampi
The red spotted purple is one of two varieties of brush-footed butterflies that have the scientific name Limenitis arthemis.
Read More

To Bee or Not to Bee? Ask the Yellow Jackets
Suzan Bellincampi
Wasps, especially yellow jackets, have been out in full force, and folks are noticing and fearing them.
Read More

Cicada Days of Summer Bring Tidings of Fall
Suzan Bellincampi

Annual cicadas have emerged and lore suggests that the first frost occurs six weeks after they begin to sing.

Read More

Dear Damselfly, the Violet Dancer
Suzan Bellincampi
Damselflies are members of the order Odonata, which also includes the more familiar dragonflies.
Read More

Winter Moths Concern Landowners, Confound Scientists
Alex Elvin

With fall coming to an end, winter moths have laid their eggs, but the males can still be seen fluttering around headlights and street lamps across the Island. Many anticipate another wave of defoliation next spring.

Read More

What Big Eyes You Have, Io Moth
Suzan Bellincampi
The Io moth also stood out from the others because of its size and coloration.
Read More

Some Captivating Caterpillars
Suzan Bellincampi
Seen now on a milkweed plant near you, the caterpillar of the milkweed tiger moth is anything but dull. Think Cousin Itt meets Halloween.
Read More

The Last Emperor
Suzan Bellincampi

Martha’s Vineyard is a great place to make your last stand.

We have almost everything that one would need — food, water, space and shelter. But if you are an insect, the best thing that the Island has going for it is what didn’t happen here — widespread DDT spraying and the introduction of a predatory parasitoid fly.

Read More

Winter Forecast on the Island: - Possible Moth Invasion?
Peter Brannen

Snowflakes have been in short supply on the Vineyard this winter, but in their place has been a blizzard of another sort: winter moths.

Concerned down-Island homeowners and some experts are reporting an unusual and troubling abundance of the ravenous creatures. If confirmed the Island’s trees face a cruel spring, but it appears that the damage, though severe, may be localized.

Read More

Pages