Star Showers
There is a good chance to see a shooting star if you are up and outside tonight, and even more likely if you are outside in the early hours of tomorrow morning. The Eta Aquarid meteor shower peaked yesterday morning but still offers a show. At its peak the Eta Aquarid meteor shower produces as many as 20 meteors in an hour.
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April Star Showers
The Lyrid meteor shower is tonight. For those who love to sit out on a still night and watch shooting stars, tonight is the first big opportunity for the year. If the weather does not cooperate, there may be something to see tomorrow night too.
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Venus, Mercury and Mars
These three planets appear close together in the early morning sky, if you are up at or before dawn and have a good view of the southeastern horizon. The bright planet Venus is the easiest to see. Mars is above and to the east of Venus. Mercury is below Venus.
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Moon and Stars
A thin crescent moon appears low in the southwestern sky after sunset tonight, when it is in the zodiacal constellation Gemini, moving into the constellation Cancer.
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Planets
The ringed planet Saturn appears high in the southeastern sky an hour after sunset. The planet shines brilliantly in the zodiacal constellation Virgo, not far from the bright star Spica. Saturn is the easiest of planets to spot, as it shows up in our night sky and not in the morning sky as the other visible planets.
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Summer Solstice
Summer arrives officially at 1:16 p.m. on Tuesday. Daylight is longer than 15 hours. It has been a progressive spring. The length of the day has advanced; unfortunately the temperature has not.
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Moonlight Dance
Tonight’s gibbous moon appears close to the bright ringed-planet Saturn. Both are in the zodiacal constellation Virgo.
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Moonless Nights
The last nights of June are mostly moonless. For those who like to look at the stars, this is a wonderful opportunity. The moon won’t interfere until well after 3 a.m.
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Sliver Moon Fireworks
A thin crescent moon will hug the southwestern sky on the evening of Monday, July 4. If the weather cooperates, viewers will not only have a great view of a manmade spectacle, but will see the earth’s nearest neighbor before it slips below the horizon.
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Let’s Talk About Our Future
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