New Year Moon
The gibbous moon appears close to the bright planet Jupiter on New Year’s Eve. It is even closer to the big planet on Monday night. The two appear high in the eastern sky after sunset and high in the south by midnight.
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Rare Glimpse of Mercury
If the weather cooperates, there is a rare opportunity to get some help seeing the distant and hard-to-spot planet Mercury close to the horizon tomorrow morning.
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Red in the Morning
Tomorrow night, just before midnight, the moon rises in the east. It appears between the two zodiacal constellations Leo and Virgo. For those who wait until later in the early morning, the moon appears higher in the east and is more clearly accompanied by the bright red planet Mars.
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Holly Moon
Tomorrow night’s full moon, the Holly Moon, rises in the east at about sunset and commands attention all night long. The moon is in the zodiacal constellation Taurus. Early Sunday morning, the moon sets in the west at about the time that the sun rises in the east.
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Crossing Taurus
A large gibbous moon and brilliant Jupiter appear together as a pair, a spectacle high in the eastern sky on Tuesday night. Both are in the small zodiacal constellation Aries.
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Celestial Pairings
For those with a clear view of the western sky, there is a pretty picture tomorrow night after sunset. A thin crescent moon appears next to the bright planet Venus. The two are together just above the horizon for one night only. Look a half hour after sunset, and as the sky darkens, the two celestial objects will begin to shine.
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Saturn Returns
After spending some time amid the glow of twilight in the evening during late summer and early fall and then shifting to dawn, Saturn is our morning planet. The ringed-planet rises in the southeastern sky well before the sun. On Tuesday morning, you’ll have no trouble finding Saturn. A thin crescent moon appears nearby.
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Venus Rising
The brightest planet in the night sky hovers low in the west just after sunset. Venus is not an easy planet to see unless you have a clear view of the western sky. Standing along the north shore, from West Chop to the Gay Head Cliffs offers the clearest view. There it hovers for a short time in the twilight, outshining all others.
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Storm Season
Daylight Saving Time ends on Sunday. For those who enjoy stargazing, that means an extra hour for favorite evening activities. Standard time arrives at 2 a.m. Sunday.
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Planets Aligned
Venus, the brightest planet, hovers over the southwestern sky just after sunset. In the month ahead, Venus gets higher in the west and more visible. Tonight and for the coming week, the planet Mercury will also be visible, hovering right beneath Venus.
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