Steamships and Ferries

Nobska Grounded in Heavy Fog Off Oak Bluffs Beach

Passersby near the Oak Bluffs public beach were startled yesterday morning when, eerily, out of a think morning fog, crept the bow of a large white steamer heading straight toward shore. Moments later, the passengers aboard the boat must have been equally astonished. The Nobska, oldest of the Steamship Authority’s fleet, missed the wharf because of the fog, and ran aground about 50 feet offshore and 200 years south of the Authority wharf.

Oak Bluffs Wharf is Kindled into Destructive Fire

A spectacular blaze, the cause of which is not definitely determined, destroyed the freight she and outer end of the Oak Bluffs steamboat wharf late Wednesday afternoon, involving a loss of property owned by Vincent’s Fish Market, on the dock property, the value of which was set at $30,000 and a loss to the Steamship Authority, covered by insurance, not yet even approximated. The fish market equipment was uninsured, according to David Vincent, the proprietor.
 

Uncatena Launched To Cheers, Bubbles: All Three Authority Wives Swing Bottles

Thrice blessed, the motor vessel Uncatena slid down the ways at Blout's shipyard in Warren, R.I., with the high tide on Sunday evening. After her fitting out, she will arrive at Woods Hole before long to join the rest of the Steamship Authority's fleet.

The triple blessing came during the christening ceremony, when not just the customary one bottle of champagne but three were smashed against the Uncatena's bow, each wielded by an Authority member's wife, the whole process making for an excess of bubbled and splintered glass.

There is Balm in Gilead - Governor Signs Boat Bill

Governor [Foster] Furcolo signed the new Steamship Authority bill shortly before 2 p.m. on Tuesday. Under the terms of the new law, the present Authority will be replaced Jan. 1, 1961, by a new Authority of three members, one of Dukes County - who have already persuaded Robert M. Love to accept the appointment - one named by the selectmen of Nantucket, and one by the selectmen of Falmouth. New Bedford will be responsible for 40 per cent of the deficit for 1960, but after the end of this year will have no responsibility, no representation, and no guarantee of service.

Bill to Free Islands from City Goes to Governor

Only the signature of Governor Furcolo now remains to turn into law the bill setting up a new Steamship Authority with three members, locally appointed, to represent the Vineyard Nantucket, and Falmouth, and with final emancipation from New Bedford. State House observers and others believe that the governor will sign the measure promptly, although the strong political pressure from New Bedford is not discounted.
 

Ferry Troubles Back in 1700s

These troubled times are not the only occasion on which inhabitants of Martha's Vineyard have had difficulty obtaining passage by boat to the mainland. Ask the oldest inhabitant as to boat service, and the chances are that he will refer to the good old days when no difficulties presented themselves and life was sweet and peaceful.

The Battle’s O’re the Strife is Done - Hallelujah!

The long boat strike came to an end last night after the ratification of an agreement with the unlicensed men closely following the pattern of that previously reached with the licensed men. The agreement is, in essence, the modified 0-4-4 proposal which had received widespread publicity.
 
The vote of the union for ratification after a prolonged session lasting until 6 last night, was 90 to 6. The Authority voted unanimously, 4 to 0, for ratification.
 

Reviews 150 Years of Steamship History

Dealing with the more than 150 years-history of steamboat transportation between the Island and mainland, Mr. Love styled his talk, The Evolution of Operation, Wood Boilers to Gas Turbines. He also brought out the little-known fact that far from being a new idea, the inclusion of Hyannis in the Island boat system was carried out over a long period of years and with a high degree of success.

Steamer History Is Vineyard History

Steamer history is Vineyard history, even now, for the arrival of the air age has not diminished the necessity of boat service.

It is likely that regular boat service between Martha’s Vineyard and the mainland was being operated by the year 1800. This does not mean daily service, however, for in the old times the packets and even the steamboats that followed them, would run on certain days of the week. Sailings were arranged according to the time of year and the needs of traffic.

Nantucket Drops In But Briefly For A Vineyard View: Impressions of Strength, Minus the Beauty – her Narrow Passages

The new ferryboat Nantucket, hailing (God save the mark!) from New Bedford, stopped briefly at Vineyard Haven on Tuesday – about an hour and a half – to give the people who are paying half the bill an opportunity to see the new boat. Some of them did, but the view was hardly satisfactory, the time being limited and the boat swarming with children taking advantage of the spring vacation from school.

Pages