African American History

Robert Tankard Named As the Interim Principal At West Tisbury School

The West Tisbury school committee voted last night to appoint Robert A. Tankard as interim principal at the West Tisbury School, ending with smiles and expressions of success a search process which began just three weeks ago.
 
“I think you got a good man,” said Pat Gregory, a West Tisbury resident who served on an advisory panel made up of teachers, parents and other com­munity representatives.

Gordon Parks: Artist Talks of His Life And Works

Life Magazine photographer Gordon Parks gave a talk at the Union Chapel in Oak Bluffs on Wednesday night. For the Vineyard it was  a first. The 79-year-old black artist not only in photography but in the fields of prose, poetry, movies and music stood before an audience of 150 people and said that he is creatively stronger than ever.
 
At every opportunity, the audience applauded. Included in a program of slides were not only photographs that are known around the world but images from his latest efforts, which will be published soon in a book.
 

Island Life and Early History of the NAACP: Two Women Share Threads of Reminiscence

In the 1920s and ’30s, black families could not buy property in Edgartown. And although Oak Bluffs was a gathering place for black professionals back to the 19th century, their children, home from college, were seldom able to work as clerks in local shops.
 
When the civil rights movement spread across America in the 1960s, the Vineyard was separate in many ways. The black community here was prosperous and thriving, the regional high school was integrated and race relations were cordial.
 

Judge Tucker Brings New Dignity To Sessions of Island Court

A man and woman charged recently with sleeping in Ocean Park, a violation of Oak Bluffs law, came before the Dukes county district court judge Herbert E. Tucker, Jr. and were ordered to pay a $25 fine. They told Judge Tucker they needed until 1 p.m. that afternoon to pay.
 
At 1 p.m., the couple did not appear. They had gone home to Fairhaven.
 

Lois Mailou Jones: a Career with No End of Creativity

There is no end to Lois Mailou Jones’ creative resources.
 
The name itself is poetry. A youthful, energetic 72, Lois Jones is the veteran of a long and fruitful career in the arts. Being black and a woman, her accomplishment is especially significant.
 
As early as age 14, composer Harry T. Burleigh had advised Lois that if she wished to establish a serious career, she would have to go abroad in order to get full exposer and avoid the disadvantage of being black in the United States.
 

The School Superintendent: Man of Questions and Humor

His education began in the anthracite regions of Pennsylvania, in small towns like Shepton and Port Carbon.
 
He had come to the smoky mining areas of the state as a young lad from Front Royal, Va., his birthplace, a small resort community nestled in the Blue Ridge mountains. His father was a successful auto mechanic after long military service in the army.
 

Open Door Club Now A Memory: Mrs. Edna Smith, Founder Sells Her Home

The little white house behind shrubs at the corner of Cooke street and Tilton Way that, for more than three decades, has been a home away from home for household help in Edgartown, no longer will be welcoming the lonely next summer.

N.A.A.C.P. Chapter Formed on Island To Study Human Relations on the Vineyard

As the result of interest shown at a meeting Monday night, the Island now has a chapter of its own of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.
 
The parish house of Grace Epis­copal Church in Vineyard Haven was jam-packed Monday evening to hear Rev. Henry L. Bird talk about his experiences in Williamston, N. C., where he participated in a civil rights demonstration along with ten other New England ministers last month.
 

Brilliant Career of New Attorney General

As a young man, Edward W. Brooke wanted to be a doctor. Today, he is the first Negro to win state-wide office in Massachusetts and is the attorney general-elect, writes Ronald A. Wysocki of the Boston Globe.
 
It was while he was in Italy as an infantry captain in World War II that he decided to practice law. Disturbed by the indifference in which officers were chosen as defense counsel in courts-martial - many without any inkling or military law - he began a study of the subject.
 

“Cottagers” Aid Drive for Hospital at Bluffs

The Cottagers Club ended its first active season, well pleased with its donations to the Martha’s Vineyard Hospital auxiliary and the Martha’s Vineyard Hospital as its first charitable ventures.

The Cottagers Club came into tentative being last summer when a group of friends decided to direct some of their combined energies toward some unselfish enterprise beneficial to Island charities. This summer at the first official meeting the enthusiasm was contagious, and thirty-eight members now comprise the active list of the cottagers.

Pages