African American History

A New Day Dawns for the Bradley Memorial

The Bradley Memorial Baptist Church of Oak Bluffs is happy now to be in possession of a new church home where services have been held the past three Sundays. The structure which stands opposite the Oak Bluffs town hall on Pequot avenue, was built by the First Baptist Church and I used for many years until this congregation disbanded and sold the property to the Odd Fellows Fraternity.

Open Door Club Finds Its Niche: For 12 Years It Has Played An Important Role

Twelve years ago a group of men and women, domestic employees, who came to Edgartown, formed a club to provide a means of social contact which was otherwise lacking,. and to make possible pleasant use of leisure time. Fer the past five years the membership has been sixty-five. The idea of the club came from Louise Hayer of EngLwood, N. J.

H. T. Burleigh Was One of Music’s Great Figures

Harry Thacker Burleigh, eminent composer, singer, and arranger of Negro spirituals — and who was for more than thirty years a summer resident of the Vineyard — died in Stamford on Sept. 11 at the age of 82. He was one of the great figures in music in his generation.

Powell Wins Nomination

Rev. Adam Clayton Powell, pastor of the Abyssinian Baptist Church in New York city, and a summer resident of Oak Bluffs, won both the Republican and Democratic nominations for congressman in the 22nd district in New York on Tuesday. He is apparently assured of election as the first Negro representative from New York.

Interesting Vineyarders: Rev. Oscar E. Denniston

The student of Vineyard history, at least such history as has been published, will recognize the fact that it was largely through the clergy that things were accomplished during the first hundred and fifty years of the Island’s existence as a colony and province. Not only did they preach the word of God to whites and Indians, but they worked energetically to promote various industries and acted as advisors in settling all manner of disputes which arose, besides writing wills and other legal documents and keeping records, in many cases, being the only ones now existing.
 

The True Story of a Fugitive Slave: Or the Story a Gay Head Grandmother Told

It was a few years before the Civil War that the incident here related took place. A large vessel in the lumbor-carrying trade was north-bound from Charlestown, South Carolina, and thereon a slave had concealed himself, hoping that when Boston was reached he would find an opportunity to gain his freedom.

Union Victory

The Anti-Slavery Amendment to the Constitution, passed the House of Representatives of the United States Congress, on Tuesday last. As the resolution has passed the Senate, nothing is now required but the endorsement of the measure by three-fourths of the States.

 

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Frederick Douglass

While upon this subject, it may not be out of place to state that Frederick Douglas, the colored gentleman and orator, will lecture before an “Association of gentlemen,” at the Town Hall on Saturday evening next. We are not advised as to his subject, but suppose from his antecedents, that he will treat mainly upon this subject of slavery in our country.

The Dred Scott Decision

The decision of a majority of the Judges of the Supreme Court adverse to the right of citizenship of this individual, has called forth many severe comments from the press in the free states, and also from the pulpit. Personal abuse of the Judges expressing this opinion, and especially of Chief Justice Taney, has characterized many of these strictures.

An Old Landmark Gone

Mrs. Nancy Michael, known to most our readers by the familiar cognomen of “Black Nance” is no more. She departed this life on Saturday last, at a very advanced age. Probably she was not far from 100 years old. She had changed but little in her appearance for 40 years past; and those who knew her 50 years ago looked upon her as an old woman. She was a very remarkable character in her day.

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