Felix Neck Wildlife Sanctuary

Fall Festival at Felix Neck

Celebrating fall is a tradition at Felix Neck and it comes with hayrides, face painting, live music by the Flying Elbows, food, wreath-making, crafts and even a look at the baby barn owls through the ingenious owl cam.

Nature's Classroom Has No Walls

Last Friday morning, in the shady woods of Felix Neck Wildlife Sanctuary, camp counselor Noah McCarter sat on a fallen log and held a tiny blue and white feather in his hand.

“What kind of bird do you think it was from?” he asked a camper sitting quietly beside him.

“A blue jay!” Nora exclaimed.

Noah placed the feather in Nora’s hand and she proudly shared what she just learned.

Make Way for Stormy the Duckling

When a newly hatched mallard duckling crossed Clevelandtown Road Sunday, it was embarking on an odyssey. The trip would take it down a storm drain and then to a new home among chickens. It would involve police, the highway department and the kindness of strangers. It would give the duckling (gender yet unknown) a name: Stormy. Stormy, less than a week old, was observed Sunday crossing Clevelandtown Road when he walked across a storm grate and fell through to the bottom. “He was seen swimming in circles down at the bottom,” Edgartown police Sgt. Craig Edwards said.

Citizen Scientists, Birds of Prey Flock to Felix Neck

The thunder and rain held off just long enough for Felix Neck Wildlife Sanctuary to host its Citizen Science Celebration last Saturday. Visitors had the opportunity to participate in hands-on citizen science work, starting with a guided bird walk and ending with a salamander survey.

The event was held so adults and children could get an up close look at the various data gathering activities happening at the sanctuary and to inspire volunteerism.

Felix Neck Camp

Felix Neck Wildlife Sanctuary is once again offering Fern & Feather Natural History Day Camp scholarships and discounts to year-round Vineyard residents.

Felix Neck Fall Festival

The Felix Neck Fall Festival is turning 22 this year. It takes place on Friday, Nov. 23, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. (raindate Nov. 24). The event can be summed up with the words; Migrate, Hibernate, Adapt. There are hayrides, face painting, live music by The Flying Elbows, food, wreath making, crafts for kids and birds of prey.

Light Fever

We are all fired up at Felix Neck!

And why shouldn’t we be? Summer staff is here, camp is going strong and we are getting ready for the big parade next week. But it isn’t just the kids and counselors who are animated.

Our fields are full of light and love in the form of bright beetles. I know exactly what Bishop Reginald Heber was experiencing when he observed, “Before, beside us, and above, the firefly lights his lamp of love.”

Volunteer, Then Barbecue At Felix Neck Sanctuary

Mass Audubon’s volunteer day is next Saturday, April 28 from 9 a.m. to noon.

To help out, head over to the Felix Neck Wildlife Sanctuary and after the work enjoy a thank you barbecue lunch.

Projects will span age ranges and abilities and go toward fulfilling any community service projects that need checking off. Help spruce up the butterfly garden, clear paths, rejuvenate soil, build a picnic table, or battle some invasive Bittersweet.

Bring work gloves and whatever tools you think you might need.

Felix Neck Birdathon

Saturday, May 14 dawned a little differently. It was the morning of Felix Neck’s Birdathon and there was not a strong wind roaring out of the northeast. The woodlands were pretty quiet as the day started out overcast, but the sun shone through about 9 a.m. and seemingly brought the woodlands to life. The complete list of birds observed on that Saturday appears at the end of this column; here are a few highlights.

Felix Neck Festival Celebrates Place

As the moon rose over Sengekontacket Pond on Sunday night, Felix Neck education coordinator Cristina Pereira led a small group of adults through the trails of the sanctuary. The next day, Ms. Pereira guided a group of high school students for their morning lesson about otter scat remains.

But no matter who Ms. Pereira or other educators at Felix Neck are working with, the goal remains the same: to encourage Islanders to engage with their natural habitat.

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