With Island ponds suffering from the effects of development, the Martha’s Vineyard Shellfish Group is looking at an old foe in a new light. The shellfish group has been studying the invasive wetland grass phragmites as a possible means for removing nitrogen from coastal ponds.
I know he’s sitting on our shoulders, organizing everything from step off to guest speaker to laying of wreaths to the hanging of flags. Gentleman and patriot Ed Colligan is very much on my mind this Memorial Day weekend, our first without him, he who began the tradition of the Avenue of Flags. He who was so devoted to his community, his country, his family and friends.
A lot of attention will be paid, no doubt, to the Belmont Stakes in two weeks when bettors handicap the chances of the first Triple Crown contender in years. Horse racing may indeed be the Sport of Kings but in Oak Bluffs all eyes are on the sport of Presidents — bowling at the newest jewel of Cottage City.
Vineyard business leaders are showing more than the usual blend of hope and optimism for a profitable summer, as the Island gears up for Memorial Day. But the difficulty in finding seasonal workers is more acute than ever, they say.
The seventh and eighth graders in the All-Island “A” band took home top honors at the Great East Music Festival in Wilbraham on May 1.
It is 5:30 a.m. on a Sunday morning. I am drinking a cup of coffee, and my wife Cathlin is having half a cup. Her adrenaline has her mostly wide awake and we don’t want to tip the scales.
Last spring, I had the opportunity to organize a trip to the State House with a group of high school students at the Martha’s Vineyard Public Charter School and their teachers to talk about our local farm-to-school program.
Prom night was another success both at the Beach Plum Inn and then as the party continued at the YMCA.
Spring has arrived this year like a virtual slide show of sound, light and color, overtaking a landscape that the harsh winter had left in tatters.

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