Hurricanes and Storms

These are the Deepest Questions of Bob

The first question people ask after a hurricane is, “If a tree falls in your backyard and it doesn’t make a sound who is responsible for cutting it up?” Ever since Hurricane Bob hit Martha’s Vineyard this question has been debated from one end of the Island to the other.

I was in Shirley’s Hardware Store trying to return batteries that I was hoarding during the storm, when I saw Thompson confront Bigalow. “When are you going to get your bloody oak tree out of my backyard?” he demanded.

Federal Disaster Relief Effort Opens to Ease Storm Damage Here

The region’s first federal disaster aid briefing begins this morning in Edgartown as officials scramble to fund reconstruction and cleanup in the aftermath of Hurricane Bob.

Town civil defense directors meet with Richard Nocella, a Federal Emergency station at 11 this morning. FEMA representatives will hold sessions in the hurricane-torn countries of Barnstable, Bristol, Plymouth, Essex and Middlesex in the coming week.

The Changing Island Face: A Storm’s Surgical Srike

Usually the brush is so think this time of year one can hardly bushwhack from the shore to the remnants of the Menemsha Hills brickworks.

These aren’t usual days.

Now one just has to watch for all the debris and driftwood littering the downed brush when walking from the beach to the brickworks.

Behind the brickworks and to its sides the brush remains green and virulent. But Hurricane Bob leveled the vegetation directly before the former factory.

Hurricane Bob Brings Harvest of Sorrow

The shock waves of last week’s storm are still rippling through Island fields as farmers anxiously watch their crops to see the extent of the damage.

Scorched leaves and windblown plants are the legacy of Hurricane Bob across the Island. Farmers are now harvesting the remainders of some crops and continuing to market their goods. Many say the storm came at the peak of an excellent season, eradicating some crops that would otherwise have continued through the fall.

Hurricane Losses Top $5.5 Million; State Seeks Relief

Martha’s Vineyard officials estimate Hurricane Bob cut a $5.5 million path of destruction when it tore through the Vineyard Monday afternoon. Civil defense directors rushed preliminary figures to Boston Wednesday in time for acting Gov. Paul Cellucci’s request that the President declare the state a national disaster area.

Town leaders received notice from the state Wednesday that they had just 24 hours to compile the first damage report, which set the preliminary cost of cleanup and repair of public facilities at $2.5 million.

Recovery from Hurricane Begins, Day by Day

The main commercial centers of the Vineyard had power restored by late yesterday as Islanders began the slow process of hurricane recovery, and Commonwealth Electric Company officials said they expect 80 per cent of the power to be restored to the six towns by the weekend.

Passage of Hurricane Through Harbor Leaves a Broad Trail of Wrecked Boats

It was the Vineyard’s first resort season hurricane and Edgartown harbor paid dearly for its popularity Monday afternoon.
 
The last great tropical storm to wrack the Edgartown harborfront came in 1944. Then, the town was still mostly a fishing village, and the lumber on the beaches was made up of timber piers and the shacks of working men.
 
In 1954, two hurricanes savaged the harbor. The first, Carol, showed what a terrible storm could do to a popular anchorage if the season was still late summer.

Damage in Millions; Worst Destruction Is Seen on Harborfront

The earliest hurricane in New England history roared up the East Coast Mon­day, plowing across Martha’s Vineyard with harbors full and seasonal popula­tion at its peak. Hurricane Bob lashed the Island with winds officially clocked at 98 miles per hour and reported in places as high as 110.
 
At 11 a.m. Monday the storm was building and there were squalls. Seasoned Islanders were convinced this was weather by noon as reports of 85 to 90-mile­per-hour winds began to spread. By 3 p.m.

Hurricane Gloria Slams Westward; Vineyard Damage Is Minimal

Hurricane Gloria swept past the Vineyard Friday, veering west and north and carrying less force than predicted, but nonetheless left splintered trees and toppled power lines in her wake.
 
The storm, billed as potentially one of the most dangerous in history, caused no serious injuries on the Vineyard and only minimal property damage, Island officials reported.
 
By Saturday evening most of the felled tree branches were cleared or pushed to the side of roads and electricity was restored to Island homes.
 
Winds whipped across Vin

Furious Hurricane Belle Blows in; the Vineyard Battens Down

High winds, high tides, and heavy rains battered the Island last night as hurricane Belle swept destruction across New England.
 
Packing winds 100 miles per hour or better and rainfall in excess of five inches, and traveling at 25 miles per hour, the hurricane was a powerhouse, even if it was little - only 75 miles across.
 
The Vineyard was braced for heavy damage, but as Islanders finally retired last night, they were unsure whether the Island was in for the worst drubbing it has seen since the one-two punch of hurricanes Carol and Edna in 1954,

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