Hurricanes and Storms

Distant Sandy Delivers Powerful Blast With Flooding, Erosion

Hurricane Sandy, the historic storm that dealt a knockout blow to New York city and the New Jersey coast early this week spared the Vineyard for the most part. But while the center of the storm stayed hundreds of miles away, the Island experienced near-hurricane conditions throughout the day on Monday, including serious flooding and coastal erosion, forcing school closures, transportation shuts downs and a day indoors for most Islanders, often without power.

Island Crew, Caught in Perfect Storm, Fought for Their Lives in 1991

On Oct. 19, 1991, 11 days before a piece of “the perfect storm” hit Martha’s Vineyard, three people left the Menemsha harbor on their way to the Bermuda. Nine days later, 100 miles from their destination, the three abandoned their sinking sailboat and all of their belongings to climb aboard a mammoth British container vessel that hours before had picked up their faint mayday call.

Floyd Passes Through

Remnants of the year’s worst hurricane passed over the Vineyard last night, delivering both high winds and rain. Hurricane Floyd, a storm that formed in the tropical waters of the Atlantic, began disrupting life on the Island days before it arrived.
 
With the sun still shining, Steamship Authority ferry service was suspended yesterday after the MV Martha’s Vineyard completed its run to the Vineyard at 11:30 a.m.

Hurricane Bonnie Dies South of Vineyard

The storm formerly known as Hurricane Bonnie swerved south and east of the Vineyard this weekend, passing some 120 miles away and bringing little more than a breeze and a bit of rain while the surf on South Beach roared.
 
The distant passage of the storm was good news to a waterfront community that had been preparing all week.

Hurricane Edouard Bashes Vineyard; High Winds and Torrential Rains Cause Property Damage and Power Outages

Hurricane Edouard slowly brushed past Martha’s Vineyard yesterday, battering the coastline with fierce, gusting winds and torrential rains, causing property damage, power outages and rudely interrupting the plans of thousands of Labor Day travelers.
 
The Vineyard was spared the brunt of Edouard - the eye of the hurricane rumbled east of Nantucket early yesterday afternoon - but its blustery, fitful grip upon the Island was long, gloomy and occasionally intense.
 
The first major winds and rain from Edouard arrived late Sunday afternoon.

Damage from Northeaster Is Set at Walloping $3.4 Million

The northeast storm that walloped the Island last week caused an estimated $3.4 million in damages.
 
Martha’s Vineyard fared better than her Cape Cod and Nantucket neighbors.

Coast Guard Launches Air Rescues At Sea During Height of Storm

Five fishermen were stranded on Nomans Land for more than five hours Wednesday, waiting for the U.S. Coast Guard to rescue them.
 
The fishing crew were aboard the Michelle Lane, laden with fish and bound for New Bedford when it ran aground at 1:10 a.m. off the south side of Nomans.
 
The crew contacted the Coast Guard about their predicament. At 9:56 a.m.

Storm Fury Spreads Scene of Damage Across Island

The northeaster that battered the Vineyard this week was like a hurricane, only worse. This time the wind lasted a lot longer than four hours. It lasted days.
 
The Island received a hint of the coming severity on Tuesday. The South Shore had breached in several places. At high tide that day, parts of Beach Road in Vineyard Haven flooded. Seaweed and water filled boats tied to the town dock at Owen Park.
 
Wednesday started off blustery.

Tidal Surges, Winds Turn Vineyard into New Disaster Zone

A huge Atlantic Ocean storm with the ferocity of a hurricane and the power of a winter northeaster pounded the Vineyard this week, raging across barrier beaches and sandy Island perimeter with flood tides not seen since the double hurricanes of 1954.
 
On Wednesday ferry service to the Vineyard was suspended and the Vineyard was lashed by high winds and angry seas, which rose up and flooded the main areas of the down-Island towns with two or three feet of salt water.
 
Coastal houses became islands and the Beach Road between Edgartown and Oak Bluffs

Second Spring After Late Autumn

A stalk of butterfly weed pushed its fiery orange flowers out of a green stem in a West Tisbury field, an unusual sign of a season past.

Spring is springing in September. Lilac bushes and cherry trees are bursting with blossoms and the fresh green leaves of spring, while oak trees settle in for their long winter’s nap.

It seems, from our human perspective, that the hands on the seasonal clock have been spun too far and the spring has snapped. Has nature gone haywire?

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