Penelope Wilson
The shock waves of last week’s storm are still rippling through Island fields as farmers anxiously watch their crops to see the extent of the damage.
Hurricanes and Storms
Hurricane Bob
Rachel Orr
Usually the brush is so think this time of year one can hardly bushwhack from the shore to the remnants of the Menemsha Hills brickworks.
Hurricanes and Storms
Hurricane Bob

1954

Earnest G. Friez Jr., manager, said that he thought that the Harbor View Hotel had weathered the Tuesday weather in comparatively good shape. “We were very fortunate,” he said, “compared to the trouble some were in.” One chimney fell on the ell of the main hotel, over employees’ quarters, and smashed through the roof into a room on the third floor. Other than that the damage was confined to a few chairs, windows and shutters and shingles.

The Vineyard’s third hurricane roared over the Island Tuesday, reached the high mark of a flood sea in some places exceeding that of 1938, and left a scene of destruction as the wind abated and the seas fell. The high of the tidal flood came about noon. All the serious damage was inflicted between mid-morning and a little past noon.
The back road between Edgartown and Vineyard Haven seemed to have weathered the storm pretty well, bordered by sturdy scrub oak. However, as the road nears Vineyard Haven, the taller trees in the vicinity took a severe beating and consequently, so did the power lines.
 
 
In Vineyard Haven, Beach road was inundated and was still impassable in the middle of the afternoon. Merchants with businesses on the road, who appeared to start a day’s work, soon found that they were marooned throughout the morning and part of the afternoon. Beach street was also flooded.

1945

The Kelley House garden in Edgartown resumes a portion of its former beauty as it is cleared of the wreckage of the hurricane, and the setting has changed through the addition of two annex buildings increasing the capacity of the ancient hotel.
 

1944

A great many trees were knocked down by the wind at the former Sullivan Jones place, Edgartown. The road leading into the estate, now owned by William B. Dinsmore, was completely blocked by fallen trees.

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The Vineyard Sound lightship was lost with all hands the night  of the hurricane. The luckless vessel, with a crew of eleven, was at her station off the tip of Cuttyhunk in Vineyard Sound, when she was presumably overwhelmed, with no chance to radio a message of her approaching fate and ask for aid.
 

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