Vineyard Gazette
The first powwow to be held on Gay Head since the days of King Philip took place in that town last night, and the flavor and spirit of those ancient days was revived so far as possible when Loren
Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head
Wampanoag history
Powwows
Vineyard Gazette
To assure that the identity of the Vineyard’s Indians, their history, culture and tribal lands will be preserved, a Wampanoag Tribal Council of Gay Head was organized on Saturday, and Mrs.
Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head
Wampanoag history
Kate Dario
A new permanent installation at the Aquinnah Wampanoag Indian Museum museum, Our History in Perspective, had its grand opening on Saturday. It details the over 10,000-year history of the Wampanoag people on the Vineyard.
Wampanoag history
Aquinnah Cultural Center

2021

Dozens of Wampanoag tribal members from Aquinnah, Chappaquiddick and Mashpee gathered at Felix Neck Wildlife Sanctuary Monday afternoon to observe Indigenous Peoples' Day.
A new permanent installation at the Aquinnah Wampanoag Indian Museum museum, Our History in Perspective, had its grand opening on Saturday. It details the over 10,000-year history of the Wampanoag people on the Vineyard.

2020

More than 100 people signed on for an internet videoconference with the chairman and vice chairwoman of the Mashpee Wampanoag tribe, Cedric Cromwell and Jessie Little Doe Baird, Monday afternoon.

2019

Every year, a new chapter has been added to “Our” Story: 400 Years of Wampanoag History, a recurring exhibit at the Aquinnah Cultural Center.

2011

Jessie

For more than a century on Martha’s Vineyard and Cape Cod, the words of the Wampanoag were not their own.

“It was prophesied that language would go away from here for a time,” Jessie Little Doe Baird intones at the opening of filmmaker Anne Makepeace’s documentary We Still Live Here. “When the appointed time came, if the people here decided that they wanted to welcome language home then there would be a way made for that to happen.”

2007

Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head Marks Recognition Anniversary

By IAN FEIN

When the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah) broke ground on a community center building in the spring of 2004, tribal leaders envisioned it as an important gathering place, and said young members would be shooting hoops inside the new gymnasium by the end of the summer.

Three years later, the building is still unoccupied, sitting half-finished on tribal lands.

Pages