Vineyard Gazette
The airfield on the central plain of Martha’s Vineyard is beginning to shape up as something more than raw earth, mud, and the destination of building materials trucked over the roads from the st
World War Two
Naval Auxiliary Air Facility
Martha's Vineyard Airport
Vineyard Gazette
The well-kept secret of the Army's experimental base at Katama during the fall and early winter of 1943 is disclosed at last, in this issue of the Gazette. Ten miles of heavy pipe were delivered, with other equipment, beginning in August, and during the following months five one-mile lengths of pipe were laid in the ocean with the aid of tugs, and welded together into an experimental pipeline under conditions similar to those which would be encountered in laying a gasoline supply line under the English Channel.
World War Two
South Beach

1941

Garrett Hagen, of the United States Department of Justice, has completed a search at the registry of deeds in Edgartown looking toward the acqui­sition of Peaked Hill by the federal government for the purposes of a sig­nal station. The hill at present is owned principally by John Wesley Whiting. Preliminary surveys were made some time ago.
 
Mr. Hagen was assisted by a secre­tary and representatives of the federal engineers, and was accompanied also by a car and a chauffeur.
 
 
 
 
The six Martha’s Vineyard observa­tion posts will participate with the 700 similar posts scattered throughout New England in the communications test of the Air Defense Command which will be held this morning be­tween the hours of 10 a. m. and 12 noon.

1940

Although nothing official has been announced, it is learned on good authority that U.S. Army engineers have been making a survey of certain portions of Gay Head and Cuttyhunk within the past week, with a view to establishing suitable locations for fortifications should they be needed. The location favoried in Gay Head is the land lying between the lighthouse and the Vanderhoop estate, opposite the drive.

The eligible, man-power of Dukes County registered for the selective draft on Wednesday, the total number of registrants reaching 539. The figures for registration in the several towns are as follows: Tisbury, 174 resdents, 21 non-residents; Edgartown, 140 residents, 6 non-residents; Oak Bluffs, 132 residents, 6 non-residents; West Tisbury, 27 residents, 1 non-resident; Chilmark, 19 residents, 2 non-residents; Gay Head, 6 residents; Gosnold, 3 residents, 2 non-residents.

These are questions which have taken considerable of the Gazette staff’s time for the past week or so, and the result is not substantial.

Now and then a reader asks why the Gazette does not print anything about the war. Don’t we realize that this generation is witnessing one of the greatest ordeals the world has ever known, and that the tragedy on so vast a scale cannot fail to affect all our lives? How can we remain silent?
 
The impact of what is happening abroad is borne in upon us in a hundred different ways, and if there were anything we might say in these columns which would help toward understanding we should be glad to say it now.

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