1967

A Martha’s Vineyard Vietnam summer project officially began on Friday, July 14, when a small group met at the home of Mrs. Philip Rahv in Vineyard Haven to discuss ways and means for making such a project effective on the Island.
 
Those present were: Mrs. Paul Macy, Dr. Allen M. Butler, Mrs. Robert W. Nevin, Mrs. Roger Fisher, Mrs. Philip Rahv, and Mrs. Stanley Sheldon.
 
Word was received yesterday that Marine Cpl. Daniel S. Bettencourt, son of Mr. and Mrs. Manuel A. Bettencourt of Wilber Lane, Edgartown, had been killed in the heavy fighting for the disputed hills of Vietnam which have been in the headlines for many days. Apparently his death was caused by an enemy grenade.
 

1966

Editors, Vineyard Gazette:
 
Support of the U.S. Government’s condemnation of those who have demonstrated against that policy has been expressed in a letter signed by members of the Martha’s Vineyard Post 9261, Veterans of Foreign Wars. The Island V.F.W. post sent the following letter to the President:
 
The President
The White House
Washington 25, D.C.
 
Dear Mr. President:
 

1965

When it was announced by the military several days ago that it would accept messages from amateur radio operators to the boys in Vietnam, David Novel of Vineyard Haven, long a ham operator, decided to do something about it.
 
First he got a list from the Gazette of those Vineyard boys now serving in Vietnam and then telephoned their parents. Of the five boys now over there, Mr. Nobel has heard from the parents of three. Their messages are now on their long trip across the Pacific.
 
The statement that follows was adapted by Dwight T. Colley from notes he used at the Regional High School forum on Our Vietnam Policy held on Nov. 20. In the discussion, Mr. Colley, a year round resident of Seven Gates Farm, who fought on the front lines of both World Wars, took an opposing view to that of Dr. Allen M. Butler of Tashmoo Farm, whose statement appeared in last week’s Gazette.
 
“I am sure that the good people of our Vineyard do not need to hear the so-called ‘other side’.
 
Ten year round Vineyarders were among the 25,000 to 50,000 persons who took part in the march on Washington Saturday to protest the Unites States’ role in the Vietnam conflict. The Vineyarders, most of whom made the trip down by bus, were Mr. and Mrs. Austryn Wainhouse, Mr. and Mrs. David E. Lilienthal Jr. and their son David, Mrs. Robert W. Nevin, Mrs. Nancy Hodgson and her son Tom, and Mrs. Milton Mazer and her daughter Ruth.

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