Author Paul Schneider to Speak at Vineyard Museum

Author Paul Schneider will discuss his approach to developing the narrative voice in nonfiction and his research for his upcoming book on the Mississippi River. This event is part of the Martha’s Vineyard Museum Speakers Series and will take place on Jan. 30, at 3 p.m., in the museum’s library at 59 School street in Edgartown.

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Poets Anthology

Poets Anthology

Cleaveland House Poets Anthology is among the books on display through tomorrow at the annual Poets House Showcase in New York city, today 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

This is a display of all the poetry books published in the U.S. during the past year (2,164 titles), from micro-press chapbooks to CDs to volumes from major commercial publishers. Admission is free.

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Author Casts a Gentler Light on America
Cooper Davis

Connor Gifford, a 28-year-old man from Nantucket, was born with some extra chromosomes. Sometimes that little bit extra can be a burden; other times, a boon. But it will always mean that Mr. Gifford has Down syndrome.

Roughly one out of 1,000 people are born with Down syndrome. They share specific and easily-recognizable aspects of appearance and behavior, similarities in facial features, body type and difficulties with speech and cognition.

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What We Loved and Lost: Now and Zen Authors Urge Islanders to Hesitate
Mike Seccombe

Some years ago, as a fresh washashore, I made the mistake of honking my car horn.

It was at the blinker, coming from Vineyard Haven on an off-season day. There were but two cars: mine, and that of the woman in front who had been unaccountably stopped, for maybe a minute, maybe less. I didn’t lean aggressively on the horn, just a little beep, to say “I’m here.”

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Books, Not Bumper Stickers: Stephen Carter Defends Debate
Mike Seccombe

Best-selling author and Yale law professor Stephen Carter deplores those bumper stickers with which people advertise their views on political and social issues.

He’s sorry if that offends anyone, but he really can’t stand them, for a couple of reasons.

First, they are overwhelmingly stuck on the backs of cars; thus they convey the message “Here’s my opinion, I don’t have to look at yours.”

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Book Launch Takes Kids on Wild Trip
Holly Nadler

For a weekday in late March on Island, it was a book launch of exceptional glamour: 46 avid fans showed up. The author lectured, read and fielded questions in a turret room flanked by a small amphitheater of seats. Even paparazzi were on hand, if you count the duo from the Gazette. The reception to the reading was rousing. The questions were intelligent and penetrating. The event ended with a round of applause and a platter of cupcakes.

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Author, Editor Frances Tenenbaum Named Outstanding Garden Writer
Phyllis Meras

By PHYLLIS MERAS

Longtime Aquinnah seasonal resident Frances Tenenbaum was lauded last week in the Boston Globe’s Gardening Column as “one of the 20th-century’s outstanding American garden book editors.” Columnist Carol Stocker described the former Houghton Mifflin garden book editor as one “who helped elevate garden writing by American authors instead of following the book industry’s long trend of simply reprinting British garden books.”

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Torts Amid the Tombstones? Author Probes Afterlife Laws
Peter Brannen

When Boston College Law School professor Ray Madoff set out to write a book about the legal rights of the dead in America, she only intended to include one chapter on the law itself, devoting the rest of the book to a philosophical, psychological, sociological and even religious interpretation. But as she began prying into the more remote and cobwebbed corners of the legal system, she stumbled upon a bizarre legal world of grave robbing, posthumous procreation and cryogenic preservation that was too rich a topic; in the end, she devoted the entire book to this world.

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Illustrious Cookery Editor On Eating the American Way
Remy Tumin

When editor Judith Jones received the manuscript for Julia Child’s Mastering the Art of French Cooking, it was exactly what she had been looking for in her own kitchen. “And if I felt that way, there must be others out there,” Mrs. Jones said from her summer home in Vermont. For her and many Americans, it wasn’t just another cookbook. It was a teaching book.

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Cultural Differences

Cultural Differences

Cultural anthropologist and University of Chicago professor Richard Shweder will deliver a talk titled Engaging Cultural Differences Without Moral Panic: The Burqa, the Bris and FGM on Wednesday, August 4 at 5:30 p.m. at the Chilmark Public Library.

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