Last Groundfish Permit Stays on Island, Though Unicorn Days Are Numbered
Alex Elvin

The Nature Conservancy, working with the Martha’s Vineyard Fishermen’s Preservation Trust, has purchased the Island’s last historic groundfish permit. The permit was held by Greg Mayhew, owner of the Unicorn.

Read More

Nature Conservancy Protects Rare West Tisbury Frost Bottom
Remy Tumin
Once carved into tiny lots and peddled as a promotion for a 19th century tonic, the 100-acre tract known as the Medicine Lots has been placed in permanent conservation thanks to a purchase completed last month by TNC.
Read More

Woods Preserve Remains Wild
Julia Wells

The family of the late Edwin Newhall (Bob) Woods has gifted 500 acres of rare and unspoiled oak forest, freshwater wetlands and frost bottom in West Tisbury and Chilmark to The Nature Conservancy, the conservancy announced early this week. The gift creates permanent protection for the heart of one of the most significant natural areas on the Vineyard.

Read More

Unspoiled, 500-Acre Forestland Is Woods Family Gift to Nature Conservancy

The family of the late Edwin Newhall (Bob) Woods has permanently gifted 500 acres of rare and unspoiled oak forest, grassland and frost bottom to The Nature Conservancy, the conservancy announced late Monday.

Read More

Adding Seven Thousand Homes: State Predicts Buildout Rate Here
Mandy Locke

The Vineyard could see as many as 7,032 more homes on its 17,475 remaining acres of developable land, officials from the state Executive Office of Environmental Affairs (EOEA) said at an Island forum held Thursday night.

"That's a relatively short time frame to be faced with some tough choices," said Christian Jacqz, director of Massachusetts Geographic Information System, in a presentation to Island officials at the Howes House in West Tisbury.

Read More

Stiltgrass Be Walking All Over the Place

Japanese stiltgrass has recently been discovered in the Longview neighborhood of West Tisbury, and the Nature Conservancy needs Islanders’ help in keeping this invasive species under control.

The harmful grass, which was introduced to the U.S. from Asia as a natural packaging material at the beginning of the 19th century, can crowd out native wildflowers, grasses and tree seedlings.

Read More