Camp Meeting History

“Camp” And “Bluff” Items

In the absence of our regular correspondents, we copy from the interesting letters of the N. B. Standard, the following facts relative to the Tabernacle.
 

The Illumination

The readers of the Gazette will please bear with us this week for the lack of extended news of local affairs. We are publishing the Camp Meeting Herald, daily and it occupies so much of time and labor that we are unable to pay that degree of attention to the Gazette as is our custom. We reproduce a number of articles from the Herald, which are well worth reading.

“Camp” and “Bluff” Items

Monday afternoon the first wedding that ever took place here was duly soleumnized at the stand, between Mr. Adin B. Capron and Miss Irene Ballou, of Woonsocket, R.I. The ceremony was performed by Sirson P. Coffin, Esq., assisted by Rev. J. W. Willet, who had been first applied to, could not legally officiate in chief, not being a resident of Edgartown. The stand was beautifully decorated with flowers and flags.

Vineyard Grove Company

The Oak Bluffers will soon have to compete with the undertaking by the Vineyard Grove Company, who owns the delightful grove on the “other side of Jordon.” This association is composed of gentlemen of excellent standing, and we learn that it is their intention to conduct the affairs of the same in a manner that cannot fail to be appreciated by visitors and must prove profitable to all concerned. Lots have been sold for building purposes, and we expect to see ere many years, a thriving settlement here.
 

Wesleyan Grove

We commend our review of the week with some details of what we saw at Wesleyan Grove, last Saturday.
 
We noticed many improvements, and beheld some splendid cottages already completed or in process of construction. Those of Nathaniel Wales, Esq., and Mr. Buckminster, of New Bedford, are beauties. We think that of Mr. B’s is the tastiest cottage on the ground.
 

Oak Bluffs Land and Wharf Company

We call attention to the interesting letter from the Harford Times, which we print to-day. This enterprising Company have already had a further survey of their grounds, and laid out a large number of new lots for cottages. The Company supposed they had enough lots staked out to supply the market for several years, but the demand has been so great, a new supply needed.

Land and Wharf Company

The Land and Wharf Company here given their grounds the unique and taking name of “Oak Bluffs,” upon which they offer a thousand lots for sale. The have now completed the most substantial and convenient wharf that could have been erected in this vicinity, within forty rods of the Camp-ground proper.

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Purchase of the Camp Ground

 

The camp ground upon Martha’s Vineyard, heretofore leased by the Vineyard Camp Meeting Association, has been purchased by that body for the sum of $1200. If there have been any doubts heretofore about the continuance of the Vineyard Camp Meeting, this will settle them. The association have acted wisely in thus obtaining full title to a property so favorably situated for their use as a camp ground and the value of which must be constantly upon the increase. - Mercury. 

 

Wesleyan Grove: Camp Meeting Herald

The approaching campaign at Wesleyan Grove is so full of matters of interest to readers far and near that we are induced to publish a daily paper, to be called the Camp Meeting Herald, which will contain a concise report of all transactions upon the ground; a brief report of all sermons, a historical sketch of the prominent itinerant clergymen, and all local items. Within this sheet the reader will find a perfect transcribe of each day upon the camp ground. It cannot fail to interest you. Send in your subscriptions.
 

Wesleyan Grove

Mr. Marchant, - I seize a few moments in the midst of other cares to drop you a line respecting the progress of our Camp Meeting Arriving here on Monday, I found the verbal reports which had from time to time reached us to the effect that great additions had been made to the internal arrangements, and great accessions to the number of tents, was indeed true. The changes last year were matters of perfect surprise, as well as admiration. Those of the present year, in some portions of the suburbs - to say nothing of the city proper - are far in advance of anything which could have expected.

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