Panel on Race Defines Issues
Yvonne Guzman
The opinions were as varied as they were emphatic: There have been great opportunities lost in the area of civil rights. Poverty affects 43 per cent of all black children in the United States, the same proportion as it did the year Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated. Still, African-American people are better off than ever before, and a recent poll showed that most are, in fact, content.
 
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For High Schoolers, A Distant Era Brought to Life
John H. Kennedy

In the first of a series on diversity at the regional high school, historian Patricia Sullivan explained the critical role college and high school students played in the Civil Rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s.

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N.A.A.C.P. Chapter Formed on Island To Study Human Relations on the Vineyard
Vineyard Gazette
As the result of interest shown at a meeting Monday night, the Island now has a chapter of its own of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.
 
The parish house of Grace Epis­copal Church in Vineyard Haven was jam-packed Monday evening to hear Rev. Henry L. Bird talk about his experiences in Williamston, N. C., where he participated in a civil rights demonstration along with ten other New England ministers last month.
 
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Civil Rights Story Set in St. Augustine
Ivy Ashe
Passage at St. Augustine spotlights civil rights campaigns in the historic Florida city. Vineyarder Esther Burgess is featured in the film, which will be screened this weekend in West Tisbury.
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Personal Memories of Rosa Parks and the Civil Rights Movement
Ivy Ashe
Vineyarders gathered at the Unitarian Universalist Church to honor the Civil Rights Movement and the memory of Rosa Parks. The guest speaker was Lucy Hackney.
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Going Beyond Accepted Story, Filmmaker Finds Deeper Truths
Ivy Ashe

In 2004 director Shola Lynch’s first film premiered at Sundance. The documentary told the story of Shirley Chis-holm, the first black woman to run for president, and her 1972 campaign. Ms. Lynch was only three years old at the time of the campaign, yet as she grew up she found herself consistently drawn to the time period. The film won a Peabody award.

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Family Perspective Defines New Film Set During Civil Rights Movement
Katie Ruppel

When Tonya Lewis Lee became a mother 17 years ago she could not find many picture books featuring children of color as everyday kids. So years later she and her husband Spike Lee wrote their own book, Please, Baby, Please, about a mischievous toddler.

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Staying in Tune With Spirit Of Civil Rights
Olivia Hull

Fifty years ago this month Harry Belafonte helped make history. On August 28, 1963, Mr. Belafonte, at Martin Luther King Jr.’s behest, recruited celebrities to speak to the estimated 250,000 Americans assembled on the Washington Mall ­— an event which, for many, defined a decade, even a century.

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Looking Back to Reflect: Martin Luther King Jr. Day
In honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the Vineyard Gazette presents a chronicle of selected texts from our archive pertaining to the civil rights movement and Martin Luther King Jr. as they intersected with life on Martha's Vineyard.
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Hear New Voices as Museum Expands African American and Civil Rights Exhibit

The oral history exhibit African American and Civil Rights Voices in the Gangway Gallery at the Martha’s Vineyard Museum is continually adding new voices. The exhibit, which opened in March of 2007, features photographic portraits and excerpts from interviews conducted by oral historian Linsey Lee with members of the Vineyard’s African American community and individuals involved in the civil rights movement. Three new voices have been recently added. Currently 14 individuals and their stories are included in the exhibit and more will be added in the coming months.

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