Storm Floods the Island on Sunday
Vineyard Gazette
Tropical storm Carrie, packing winds , of nearly 70 Moles an hour, overran the Vineyard Sunday, drenching the Labor Day holiday spirit, flooding streets, and cellars, scattering tree limbs and leaves in her path, and generally ruining the last happy weekend of the 1972 summer season.
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High Seas Not Very High Winds Not Very Strong
Vineyard Gazette
Vineyarders awoke this morning thoroughly bored with a hurricane called Esther.
 
Like some mythical nature deity, she had languished out there to the math southwest, as if on a watery Olympus of her own construction, Wednesday night and all day yesterday, sending toward the Vineyard disturbing but largely impotent manifestations of her displeasure: high seas that were not very high, strong winds that were not very strong, and rain that only intermit­tently could be called a deluge.
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Hurricane Losses Top $5.5 Million; State Seeks Relief
W. C. Platt

Martha’s Vineyard officials estimate Hurricane Bob cut a $5.5 million path of destruction when it tore through the Vineyard Monday afternoon. Civil defense directors rushed preliminary figures to Boston Wednesday in time for acting Gov. Paul Cellucci’s request that the President declare the state a national disaster area.

Town leaders received notice from the state Wednesday that they had just 24 hours to compile the first damage report, which set the preliminary cost of cleanup and repair of public facilities at $2.5 million.

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Second Spring After Late Autumn
Paula Delbonis

A stalk of butterfly weed pushed its fiery orange flowers out of a green stem in a West Tisbury field, an unusual sign of a season past.

Spring is springing in September. Lilac bushes and cherry trees are bursting with blossoms and the fresh green leaves of spring, while oak trees settle in for their long winter’s nap.

It seems, from our human perspective, that the hands on the seasonal clock have been spun too far and the spring has snapped. Has nature gone haywire?

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These are the Deepest Questions of Bob
Art Buchwald

The first question people ask after a hurricane is, “If a tree falls in your backyard and it doesn’t make a sound who is responsible for cutting it up?” Ever since Hurricane Bob hit Martha’s Vineyard this question has been debated from one end of the Island to the other.

I was in Shirley’s Hardware Store trying to return batteries that I was hoarding during the storm, when I saw Thompson confront Bigalow. “When are you going to get your bloody oak tree out of my backyard?” he demanded.

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Federal Disaster Relief Effort Opens to Ease Storm Damage Here
W. C. Platt

The region’s first federal disaster aid briefing begins this morning in Edgartown as officials scramble to fund reconstruction and cleanup in the aftermath of Hurricane Bob.

Town civil defense directors meet with Richard Nocella, a Federal Emergency station at 11 this morning. FEMA representatives will hold sessions in the hurricane-torn countries of Barnstable, Bristol, Plymouth, Essex and Middlesex in the coming week.

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The Changing Island Face: A Storm’s Surgical Srike
Rachel Orr

Usually the brush is so think this time of year one can hardly bushwhack from the shore to the remnants of the Menemsha Hills brickworks.

These aren’t usual days.

Now one just has to watch for all the debris and driftwood littering the downed brush when walking from the beach to the brickworks.

Behind the brickworks and to its sides the brush remains green and virulent. But Hurricane Bob leveled the vegetation directly before the former factory.

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Hurricane Bob Brings Harvest of Sorrow
Penelope Wilson

The shock waves of last week’s storm are still rippling through Island fields as farmers anxiously watch their crops to see the extent of the damage.

Scorched leaves and windblown plants are the legacy of Hurricane Bob across the Island. Farmers are now harvesting the remainders of some crops and continuing to market their goods. Many say the storm came at the peak of an excellent season, eradicating some crops that would otherwise have continued through the fall.

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Recovery from Hurricane Begins, Day by Day
Paula Delbonis

The main commercial centers of the Vineyard had power restored by late yesterday as Islanders began the slow process of hurricane recovery, and Commonwealth Electric Company officials said they expect 80 per cent of the power to be restored to the six towns by the weekend.

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Weathering the Storm at Railway Wharf
Vineyard Gazette
STEAMER MONOHANSETT, Railway Wharf, Holmes’ Hole,
Sept. 8th, 1869, 7:20 P.M.
 
Mr Editor: - Perhaps you may be rather anxious as to our whereabouts, so I will just say, that we are all here and have been since about six o’clock and are likely to be, for the present at least. The passage from New Bedford across the bay was rather slow, owing to a very strong south east wind blowing directly in our eyes.
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