Shellfish Group, Fishermen's Trust Eye Kelp Farming
Landry Harlan

Kelp farming has the potential to become a cottage industry on Martha’s Vineyard, a winter experiment has concluded.

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Phragmites Could Play Key Role in Health of Coastal Ponds
Landry Harlan

Regular removal of phragmites is an effective and efficient way to improve the health of coastal ponds, a study has found.

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State Money Boosts Shellfish Propagation, Community Services
Holly Pretsky

Rep. Dylan Fernandes and Sen. Julian Cyr visited the Island late last week to dole out funds for two key Island programs.

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Romancing the Oyster Is Tasty Business
Popular lore has it that oysters are an aphrodisiac. This will be put to the test, literally, on Saturday at the Harbor View Hotel as part of the annual Romancing the Oyster event.
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Shellfish Group Bestows Surprise Honor on Retiring Director
Steve Myrick

The hatchery on Lagoon Pond that has spawned a valuable shellfish industry on the Vineyard will be renamed the Richard C. Karney Solar Hatchery.

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Shucking and Jiving with the Shellfish Groove
On Saturday, the Martha’s Vineyard Shellfish Group is throwing their annual benefit party at the Chilmark Community Center.
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In Praise of the Wise Man Who Always Saw the Shell Half Full
Rick Karney
In January after over 40 years with the Martha’s Vineyard Shellfish Group, I will be stepping down as its director.
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Longtime Shellfish Group Director Will Retire
Julia Wells

Rick Karney, executive director of the Martha’s Vineyard Shellfish Group, announced that he will shift to part-time status beginning Jan. 1.

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Gazette Promotion Helps Island Ponds

The Vineyard Gazette will donate $9,000 to the Martha’s Vineyard Shellfish Group, the result of a successful subscription promotion drive that called attention to the plight of the Island’s coastal ponds.

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Shellfish Group Receives Funding for Experimental Phragmites Project
Alex Elvin

The Martha’s Vineyard Shellfish Group on Friday accepted a $135,693 federal grant that will allow it to continue studying the invasive wetland grass phragmites, which it believes could play a role in reducing the amount of nitrogen in coastal ponds.

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