Improv Show for Kids

Improv Show for Kids

Nightmares were never so much fun. During the past two weeks the campers at Imp have been learning the ways of improv — the fast action, quick reflexes of theatrical art Yoda would be proud of. But who’s to say, once the mind is unleashed to improvise at will, how the subconscious will be affected.

On Friday, July 29, you are about to find out as the campers present The Dreams and Nightmares Show at the Edgartown School.

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Shakespeare of Hollywood on Board

Shakespeare of Hollywood on Board

Each summer the folks at the Vineyard Playhouse host a series they call Monday Night Specials. This summer’s series began last Monday and runs through the summer to August 29. The idea is simple. Host one-night-only readings of plays. If you’ve never been to a reading, the experience is well worth it.

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Before Streetcar Came These Desires
Holly Nadler

Tennessee Williams (1911-1983) was born in Columbus, Mississippi, with all the proper psychological accoutrements to become a great writer. His family was abysmally dysfunctional, his mother a narcissist with a streak of snobbery, denial and grandiosity (much like the mother in The Glass Menagerie), and his father an often-absent, smalltime businessman with a temper, active fists and an aversion to his delicate son, who, as we all know, was destined to grow up to be a homosexual, a tough row to hoe in the deep South.

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They Dance by the Light of the Moon
Remy Tumin

Transformed into what appears to be a room of curiosities, the Yard’s black-box theatre this week evokes a sense of wonder. A guitar leans against a funky metal chair, a streetlight stands in one corner, a piano is angled in the other and a lamp with no shade illuminates the stage.

But there’s a softness to the lighting that smooths what might be rougher edges of junk and turns it into a collection of life’s treasures.

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Tennessee Williams Tribute

Tennessee Williams Tribute

You know about A Streetcar Named Desire. You also know about The Glass Menagerie, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, The Rose Tattoo and on and on. The work of Tennessee Williams is celebrated on stage and screen, but if for some reason you haven’t seen or read his work, the time is now.

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Big Lady, Big Laughs, Comedy Tonight

Big Lady, Big Laughs, Comedy Tonight

Some call her Big Roz. Others call her Lady Roz G. Most just call her drop-dead funny.

Roz G. is on the Vineyard July 7 through 9, as the opening performer of a summer of comedy thanks to the folks at Knock-Knock productions. All performances take place at the Katharine Cornell Theatre located at 54 Spring street in Vineyard Haven.

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Not Taken for Granted, Playhouse Receives Award

The Vineyard Playhouse has been awarded a prestigious $10,000 grant from the Shubert Foundation Inc., according to an announcement by the playhouse artistic director MJ Bruder Munafo and board president Gerry Yukevich.

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Marty Nadler Stands Up, Island Ducks and Covers

Veteran Hollywood comedy writer Marty Nadler will be performing his one-man show, Very Vineyard 2011, at Grace Episcopal Church in Vineyard Haven, on Saturday, July 9, at 7 p.m.

Mr. Nadler’s writing, producing and performing career spans more than three decades. In television, he served as script consultant for The Odd Couple, story editor and head writer for Happy Days, contributing writer for Sesame Street and guest writer for Saturday Night Live.”

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Development Heaven

Development Heaven

James Lapine (pictured) has won the Tony Award three times for the best book of a musical, for Into the Woods, Passion and Falsettos. His list of other Broadway and Hollywood credits is long and illustrious.

Mandy Hackett is the associate artistic director of the Public Theatre in New York city, one of the most vibrant and important performance spaces in New York city and therefore, by extension, the world.

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Not Off-Broadway, on to Broadway
Jonah Lipsky

From the streetfront, the Vineyard Arts Project appears to be another large house on Main street. There is no hint that past its picket fence is unfolding, in turn: life on the Texas-Mexico border; family drama at a racially-charged estate; and people singing and dancing about the financial crisis.

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