Macbeth Witches Toil and Trouble on the Double

To every play there is a season, and Halloween is the perfect season for Shakespeare’s creepiest, witchiest play: The Tragedy of Macbeth. And so, tonight and tomorrow night at 8 p.m., The Vineyard Playhouse’s Shakespeare for the Masses project will offer a free, script-in-hand presentation of “the Scottish Play,” as actors superstitiously refer to it.

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Bravo to Theatre Maestro Linda Berg

Island Theatre Workshop is celebrating Linda Berg’s achievements as director of the Children’s Theatre program for the past three years and as music director for the 13 preceding years. Festivities will take place at the Sailing Camp on Barnes Road on Saturday, Nov. 1, 2008 from 2 to 5 p.m.

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School Performance Day

School Performance Day

The members of performing arts classes at the Martha’s Vineyard Regional High School will be participating in a performance day on Thursday, Oct. 30 from 8:15 to 11:15 a.m. at the high school. Parents and the public are invited to this concert.

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Thrift, Thrift Horatio! It’s Free Bard

If the word Hamlet makes you think, Mel Gibson; if you’ve heard of Othello but never seen it; if you know there are witches in Macbeth but aren’t sure what they do ... then the gang at The Vineyard Playhouse has a tempting offer for you: give them an evening and they’ll give you the Bard — free of charge.

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Creative Drama Classes for Children Held Weekly

Phyllis Vecchia will be holding a fall creative drama workshop for four-and-half to 10-year-olds at the Oak Bluffs School. Classes began yesterday and will be held weekly from 3:30 to 4:45 p.m. Classes run through Dec. 4.

The workshop will begin with theatre warm-ups and puppet play, followed by character warm-ups, a story, costume dress-up and a performance. Each week a new folk tale or fairy tale is presented for the children to reenact into a creative drama piece. No former experience is necessary, just a desire to have fun and work in a team setting.

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Chicken Out? No, Try Out For Nancy Luce Musical

On Sunday, Sept. 28, there will be tryouts for two original one-act musicals about Vineyard history:

Nancy Luce, The Musical was originally produced in the summer of 2007 as part of Children’s Theatre Workshop summer program, with a book by Dana Anderson and music by Linda Berg.

An Island of Women, Life on the Vineyard, 1850-1852, written by E. St. John Villard, takes place at a time when much of the male population was at sea whaling. Philip Dietterich has written the music and lyrics.

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So You Think You Can Dance, Islanders?
Nicole Galland

Whether consuming or creating, Vineyarders are known for their enjoyment of the arts. On one side, the Island has a lot of galleries, artisans’ festivals and professional performances; on the other, there are classes and quality amateur opportunities for theatre, dance, music and fine arts. But it’s not common for the vocational and avocational processes to intertwine. Over the past two weeks at The Yard, choreographer Sarah Wilbur has masterminded just such an intertwining.

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The Jetty Set Arrives for Seaside Play
Nicole Galland

Word gets around on a small Island. “I only wanted to do this for my grandmother,” explained Michael Domitrovich to the crowd, “but you tell one person, who tells one person, who tells one person, and then somebody tells the Gazette, and then suddenly . . . .”

Then suddenly you’ve got an audience of more than 100 people, sitting in neat white folding chairs on State Beach, for an evening at once unique and yet quintessentially Vineyard.

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Creative Drama Classes for Children Begin Soon

Phyllis Vecchia will be holding a fall creative drama workshop for four-and-a-half to ten-year-olds at the Oak Bluffs School in the home economics room. Classes will be held on Thursday afternoons from 3:30 to 4:45 p.m.

The series of classes will begin on Thursday, Oct. 2, and run weekly until Dec. 4.

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The Patriot Act Wins Edgartown Playwright Edinburgh Raves
Mike Seccombe

One day, after a performance of his play The Patriot Act a couple of weeks ago, Ronald B. Campbell Jr. was approached by an audience member, an older man, in tears.

The estrangement between the central character in the play and his son echoed the audience member’s own estrangement from his son.

“I’m going to call him,” the man said.

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