Robert A. Culbert

Feeder News
There is a hint of good news concerning the disease outbreak that has temporarily paused the use of bird feeders.
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Shrill Sounds
A loud "SKREEE" sound is repeated every few seconds for hours on end and can be heard a quarter mile away. The sound is hard to track down, especially since the hawk may be concealed within the tree canopy.
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Remove Feeders!
The Massachusetts Department of Fisheries and Wildlife and the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology both recommend you take down your bird-feeders to prevent the spread of an unknown disease.
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Southbound Shorebirds
Tropical storm Elsa blew by on July 9-10, with little in the way of unusual bird life to show for it.
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Two Oddities
Here we are in the birding doldrums of early summer and the southward migration just starting with the arrival of the early shorebirds.
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Southbound Already
How quickly the tides turn! In early June we were still talking about birds that were headed to their northern breeding grounds.
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Quiet Time
The longest daylight of the year was on June 21, which is relevant to this column because the volume and frequency of birds singing quiets considerably.
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Sporadic Breeders
The species mentioned here are sporadic breeders that mostly pass through on their way north or back south: purple martin, bobolink, snowy egret and saw-whet owl. Only occasionally do they stay to nest.
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Storm Winds
Strong winds may cause birds to get blown off-course, ending up some place they did not intend to go. But most birds recover after the storm, with their internal GPS device getting them to where they intended to go.
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Migration Endgame
May is rapidly coming to a close and with May’s disappearance the northward migration mostly ends.
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