Art of All Types and Towns Celebrated at All-Island Show
Olivia Hull and Tara Keegan

For one artist, the term all-Island art is literal. Amid the paintings, pastels and photographs, the seaweed collages by Kathy Poehler hung on the wire fence at the Tabernacle yesterday for the 54th All-Island Art Show.

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Gay Head Gallery

Gay Head Gallery

This weekend the Gay Head Gallery is hosting a reception on Sunday, Aug. 12, from 5 to 7 p.m. for its latest show entitled Endangered Lands and Water: The Intrinsic Value of Wild Nature. The gallery seeks to promote conservation and environmental education through its artists, and this show is no different. The exhibit is a benefit for the Vineyard Conservation Society and the Moshup Trail Project — an ongoing conservation effort to protect globally rare habitat.

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Multicultural Art Show

Multicultural Art Show

The Harlem Fine Art Show (HFAS) will present a multicultural art show at Island Inn in Oak Bluffs on August 9 through 12. This is the first time the show has traveled to Martha’s Vineyard from its usual home in New York city. It has also teamed up with Pathway to Your Success, an Island non-profit dedicated to helping parents and their children plan future career choices.

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Yes, Islanders Are More Artistic
Olivia Hull

The Island’s reputation as a cultural hot spot is deserved, according to a recent study that says artistic and cultural endeavors are twice as prevalent on the Vineyard as elsewhere in the state.

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All-Island Art Show Arrives

In London, the Olympians are battling it out in feats of strength and endurance. Here on the Vineyard, we have our own contest coming up, no less feverish in its pursuit of glory, ribbons to the victors, too, but with the scales tilted to right brain activities rather than speed and brawn. Welcome once again to the All-Island Art Show.

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Urge to Create More Than Guilty Pleasure

Some people can do everything. Case in point, artist Elizabeth Langer not only creates magnificent artwork, she was also a successful lawyer working for the U.S. Depatment of Justice in Washington, DC and later in private practice.

But all that legal eagle stuff is behind her now, the creative lure so much more sharp and potent than the scales of law. Good for her. After all, the world is full of lawyers, some are even nice people, but an artist’s work is always a solo show.

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What if Goliath, Not David, Had Won?
Katie Ruppel

Dressed in a simple tunic, carrying only his slingshot and a sack of stones, a poor shepherd boy approached the nine-foot-tall giant.

With courage and a steady hand, David slung one small stone right smack at Goliath’s head, knocking out the Philistine’s war hero.

It’s a tale most are familiar with and at the forefront of the underdog mentality, said liberal theologian Harvey Cox.

“We like the underdog,” said Mr. Cox. “That’s why everyone in the Boston area despises the New York Yankees.”

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John Lennon's Artistic Message Will Possess, Caress Vineyard
Joel Greenberg
It was fitting, maybe inevitable, that Yoko Ono and John Lennon met in an art gallery at a showing of her work in London. Now, more than 40 years later, Ms. Ono has established a tradition of exhibiting Mr. Lennon’s art around the United States to celebrate her late husband’s passion for peace and love, which she says with a matter-of-factness that restores those words to their late-1960s meaning, before they became glib catchphrases for many people.
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Washashore Art

Washashore Art

One clever way to clean up a beach is to collect trash and turn it into art. That’s what artist and art teacher Wendy Shalen did, using found floating debris from beaches on the Vineyard, Long Island and Florida as subject matter for her handmade paper seascapes. The series is called Washed Ashore, and was recently exhibited at the Pound Ridge Library in New York.

The images show the closeness of nature and material culture. Garbage can be collected on some beaches as easily as drift wood.

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The Decisive Rock and Roll Moment
Katie Ruppel

After graduating from Whittier College in the 1960s, Guy Webster decided to join the army reserves for a six-month stint rather than go to Viet Nam. For the first three months he purchased, shipped and decorated Christmas trees. For the second half he taught photography, even though he had never even held a camera before that moment.

“I had never taken a photograph in my life,” remembered Mr. Webster. It wasn’t until his last month in the reserves that he shot his first roll of film. That was all it took to get him hooked.

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